Workshops

Workshop 1: Essential Fundraising Skills for NGOs

Friday, September 26, 3:30pm; Session is repeated on Sunday, September 28 at 8:30am.

One of the most critical issues that non-profits face is ensuring financial sustainability for their good works to continue. This session will encompass five components related to fundraising. First, provided will be a fundraising overview, including such issues as fundraising as a management process involving proper organizational management, effective communication and prospecting and relationship-building; discussion of the need to diversify among various sources of NGO income (grants, gifts and earned income, etc.); and examples of successful fundraising techniques. Second, examined will be steps in developing a strategic, organized and realistic fundraising plan. In this step, participants may be asked to divide into smaller groups to put in chronological order a set of fundraising planning steps. The activity will help participants to learn that all fundraising efforts must be anchored on an organization’s strategic plan. The activity will also highlight the need to do research on prospective donors before deciding on the appropriate fundraising vehicle, be it a grant proposal, conference, and so forth. The third component of the session will involve developing a winning proposal, involving prospect/donor research, concept note preparation, and other elements. The fourth component is called “organizing for success” and involves fundraising as a team effort, as well as legitimacy, transparency and accountability as prerequisites to successful fundraising. The final component will be a recap of key fundraising principles.

 Katherine Panganiban Custodio

Ms. Katherine P. Custodio serves as Director for Development in the Business Development Unit of the Venture for Fund RaisingKatherine Custodio Foundation, headquartered in the Philippines.  The Venture for Fund Raising has helped over 200 organizations from 10 countries raise funds. The Venture for Fund Raising was founded in 1999 by board members who have been experienced fundraisers for such organizations as The Asia Foundation, UNICEF, Greenpeace, OXFAM, the American Cancer Society, the National Museum, and other organizations in the United States and the Philippines. Ms. Custodio assumed her current position in October of 1999. Previous to this, she served as a Consultant and Accounts Manager for Ogilvy and Mather, handling accounts for such organizations as UNICEF (where she developed fundraising strategies, helping UNICEF to implement the largest direct mail campaign in the Philippines, building a base of 50,000 individual donors), Nestle Philippines, Unilever Philippines, and C & P Homes (Crown Asia Division). She has been the lead facilitator or facilitator at a number of fundraising and strategic resource mobilization workshops in countries such as Malaysia, Philippines, Indonesia, and Bangladesh.

 Workshop 2: Organizing an NGO for More Effective Management and Staff

Friday, September 26, 3:30pm

In this day and age when NGOs must compete with for-profit organizations as well as governmental agencies for scarce development funding, it is absolutely essential that NGOs revisit their strategic planning and make room for strategic 'human resources' management and planning.  This Workshop will explore how NGO managers and directors can better plan for, recruit, hire and manage their staff (and their volunteers) so as to ensure that their organization is more competitive and more efficient, and better able to provide cost-effective services to their stakeholders, for their clients. The workshop participants will better understand how to move from their current crisis or reactive orientation to a more forward planning, strategic (or proactive) orientation in the development of their human resources.

 Rachel Peterson

Rachel Peterson has 16 years of international development experience in training, facilitation, management and administration, organizational development, and human resource management. She recently finished serving as the Director of Finance and Rachel Peterson Administration for the $40 million USAID Primary Health Care Initiatives (PHCI) Project in Amman, Jordan. On this project, she developed and oversaw the maintenance of administrative, management, and financial systems necessary for project operation. Prior to her work in Jordan, she served as the Country co-Director for a large NGO (Mercy Corps International) operating in Bosnia-Herzegovina, where she supervised and managed project personnel, activities, and policies; over 80 national staff, and a portfolio of 12 programs valued at over $25 million. Before her work in Bosnia, Ms. Peterson managed training activities, curriculum modifications, business development, and management information systems for Development Alternatives’ (DAI) banking and business development training subsidiary. Trained in facilitation, Mr. Peterson is skilled in team building, team planning and launching, and the development of work plans. She has facilitated team building exercises, retreats, and workplans for short- and long-term projects for USAID, the U.S. Department of Energy, and private firms, and has conducted workshops for design, implementation, and evaluation teams on contracts in Latin America, the Balkans, and North Africa. She has a M.A. degree in international affairs and B.A. degrees in international affairs and in Latin American studies. Currently living in Spain, Ms. Peterson has worked in Ecuador, Guatemala, El Salvador, Peru, Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Jordan, Morocco, Spain, and Bangladesh. She is currently involved in short-term assignments in Bangladesh as an independent consultant.

 Workshop 3: The Art of Establishing Working Partnerships Among NGOs

Friday, September 26, 3:30pm.

Partnerships are very much in fashion, and the call for partnerships to tackle the problems afflicting the world emanates from virtually every major development agency and funder. The notion of partnership is appealing – a joining of skill and resources among complementary agencies to achieve what no one entity could do alone. This workshop will review experiences with NGO partnerships and collaborations, and seek perspectives on how to balance the need to be a good collaborator with the need to be strategic in your own organizational plans. We’ll examine models for organizational collaboration and discuss principles for effective partnerships. Participants should be prepared to share their stories about partnerships, including what worked and what didn’t work.

 William A. Lester

Mr. William “Bill” Lester is the Chief Technology Officer for NinthBridge, a recognized leader in the international eRider movement. William Lester A visionary in non-profit use of technology – particularly in low-resource settings – Bill serves as the primary technology strategist on all NinthBridge projects, and works with NGOs on every continent. As the Senior Director of Technology for EngenderHealth for almost ten years, Bill has been instrumental in designing and implementing Internet connectivity and technology solutions for the agency’s offices in more than 30 countries. He designed strategies to build and maintain cost-effective technology solutions, streamline upgrading of all hardware and software components, and train staff in the effective use of technology and new media tools. EngenderHealth was the winner of the 2002 United Nations Population Award. Prior to his work for EngenderHealth, Bill was a senior technology consultant for Keane, Inc., an international consulting firm. He is also on the Board of Directors for NTEN, the Nonprofit Technology Enterprise Network, an organization dedicated to “help nonprofits make more effective use of technology to advance their missions.”

Workshop 4: Reconciliation and Conflict Resolution

Saturday, September 27, 2:30pm.

Part one of this session will deal with defining Reconciliation and Conflict Resolution and distinguishing one from the other. The steps of reconciliation will be shown as a necessary lead-in to a transformatic platform in order  for the true process of conflict resolution to take place.  Part two of this session will move from theory to practice via presentation of inspiring realities of peace building on the ground in the Middle East despite the on-going conflict. Examples will be given from the speakers own experience on three levels: Grassroots- N.G.O.- Governmental. An emphasis will be placed on the roles of youth, women, humanitarian aid, and religion.

Dr. Merri Minuskin

Dr. Merri Minuskin serves as Head of the Middle East and Palestinian Authority Division of the International Institute – Histadrut. The International Institute is the largest training center for foreign students in the Middle East. The Institute was established in 1958 as a joint initiative of the Center for International Cooperation of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs–MASHAV of the State of Israel and the Histadrut, General Federation of Labor in Israel. The Institute trains leaders from emerging countries in various subjects, such as credit institutions for civil society, women’s empowerment programs, social security networks, rural area non-agricultural employment programs, community medicine, NGOs and the democratic society, management of voluntary organizations, and so forth. The Institute attempts to provide training solutions to the changing needs of grassroots and community level activities for the promotion of national development in developing countries, through people-based organizations. The central tenet of the Institute’s training is the notion that people’s organizations belonging in the civil society play an important role in sustainable development. Dr. Minuskin also serves as Pedagogical Advisor for Beit Berl College. Previously she served as Director of the Department of International Affairs and Arab Relations for the Keren Berl Katzenlson Foundation. She has done doctoral studies at Liverpool University and Beit Burl College, has done graduate studies at Bar Ilan University in Tel-Aviv, and holds a M.A. degree from Trenton State University.

Workshop 5: Working for Sustainability for NGOs

Saturday, September 27, 2:30pm.

The workshop will explore strategies for strengthening NGO sustainability, fundraising and endowment capacity, drawing on direct experience in Asia, Africa and Latin America.  The workshop will be divided into five sections: 1) Definition and elements of sustainability; 2) Tools for sustainability, including the role of staff and board; 3) Sources of funding, including local income sources, public fundraising and international donors, earned income and endowment income; 4) Key fundraising principles; and 5) Key skills and capacities needed for successful fundraising.  Questions and discussion will take place after each section.

 David Winder

David Winder serves as Director of Country Programs for The Synergos Institute. Synergos is an independent New York-based nonprofit organization founded in 1986 to develop effective, sustainable, and locally-rooted solutions to poverty. Synergos and its partners mobilize resources and bridge social and economic divides to reduce poverty and increase equity around the world. At Synergos, Dr. Winder has developed a foundation-building program that provides services such as technical assistance to grantmaking foundations, associations of foundations, and philanthropy support centers in Latin America, Southeast Asia and Southern Africa. Dr. Winder also manages a research program on grantmaking foundations. Prior to joining Synergos, he was a Fellow at St. Antony's College, at Oxford University, conducting research on the role of NGOs in Mexico. Dr. Winder worked with the Ford Foundation for over a decade, as the Ford Foundation Representative for Mexico and Central America and subsequently Southeast Asia (1987-1992). In the latter position he managed 50 staff in Indonesia, Philippines and Thailand and managed a $10 million annual budget. In these positions he expanded the size and scope of the Foundation's programs developing new areas of work in human rights, civil society strengthening, international affairs and rural and urban poverty. Dr. Winder has been affiliated to numerous NGOs, boards of directors and committees, including: WINGS, IMAG, Global Kids, Oxfam UK and St. Antony's College North American Trust. His extensive list of publications includes research on community development, the role of foundations, local philanthropy and NGOs and a sourcebook on Foundation-building. Dr. Winder holds a PhD and a Masters in Education in community development from the University of Manchester, UK. At the University, he also lectured for eleven years in social policy and planning, and acted as the Director of the Public Administration Studies Program.

 Workshop 6: Utilizing the New Technologies for Non-Profits

Saturday, September 27, 2003 2:30PM.

Imagine a more effective agency operation, built efficiently with limited funds, where information flows seamlessly in a connected and stable environment, where hardware and software appropriate to your needs functions reliably, where staff are fluent in the technology tools they need to perform their work. For many NGOs, this is simply a dream - they do not know how to take advantage of the wealth of new technologies available or how to effectively determine and prioritize their technology needs. For others, the basic systems and solutions are in place but need to be leveraged or repurposed. For others still, there is a need for affordable and reliable technology support and staff training services. This workshop will examine some of the tools of technology and new media that have transformed nonprofit organizations, and look at the process of integrating these tools into a culture that has traditionally been used to “making do”. Our focus will be on low resource environments, where electricity and telephones can be a challenge and where Internet connectivity can be expensive and/or unreliable. 

William A. Lester

Mr. William “Bill” Lester is the Chief Technology Officer for NinthBridge, a recognized leader in the international eRider movement. A visionary in non-profit use of technology – particularly in low-resource settings – Bill serves as the primary technology strategist on all NinthBridge projects, and works with NGOs on every continent. As the Senior Director of Technology for EngenderHealth for almost ten years, Bill has been instrumental in designing and implementing Internet connectivity and technology solutions for the agency’s offices in more than 30 countries. He designed strategies to build and maintain cost-effective technology solutions, streamline upgrading of all hardware and software components, and train staff in the effective use of technology and new media tools. EngenderHealth was the winner of the 2002 United Nations Population Award. Prior to his work for EngenderHealth, Bill was a senior technology consultant for Keane, Inc., an international consulting firm. He is also on the Board of Directors for NTEN, the Nonprofit Technology Enterprise Network, an organization dedicated to “help nonprofits make more effective use of technology to advance their missions.”

 Workshop 7: Consensus-based Facilitation Skills for Working in Diverse Communities

Saturday, September 27, 2:30pm.

These processes are ideal for NGO’s working with diverse community groups, and especially for working in rural areas when lack of literacy or language issues make facilitation challenging. These methods have been used in over 39 countries since 1955 and succeed in ensuring all participants feel an ownership and stake in the planning process.  The methods focus on alleviating conflict while achieving group consensus.  Participants in this workshop will receive an overview of how the methods work, an understanding of the difference between hierarchical and facilitative leadership and walk away with at least one of the methods to be able to use within their work immediately.

 J’Lein Liese

In 1991, J’Lein founded the Institute for Multicultural Success International to provide quality programs that advance cultural understanding and reduce conflict in our schools and communities. In 2002, J’Lein founded the Foundation for Global Leadership. The J'Lein Liese Foundation for Global Leadership is a non-profit organization with offices in the United States and South Africa. Its mission is to foster opportunities for global learning.  J’Lein’s work both nationally and internationally specializes in violence prevention/intervention, responding to trauma, crisis management and issues concerning diversity.  A frequent trainer and presenter, J’Lein has developed and implemented programs throughout the United States, South Africa, the Netherlands, Egypt and China.  In 1998, J’Lein was a keynote speaker at World Habitat Day in the Netherlands. In 1999, MTV and the American Psychological Association featured J’Lein’s program, JumpStart: Mastering Anger, Self-Discipline & Emotional Control, in their award -winning documentary “Warning Signs” as an effective intervention for troubled youth. Currently, J’Lein is working with the South African government to support the implementation of the new Child Justice System.  In addition, J’Lein has published numerous curricula, articles and most recently contributed a chapter in a textbook for the University of Pretoria on redirecting troubled youth.

 Workshop 8: Rehabilitating Emotionally Impoverished and Traumatized Youth

Sunday, September 28, 8:30am.

This workshop will focus on proven, effective strategies for working with young offenders, street children, gangs and former child soldiers.  The strategies in this workshop have been used extensively in the United States and South Africa. Currently, in South Africa, several government departments (including the Department of Social Development, the South African Police Service, Correctional Services and the Department of Arts, Sports and Culture), as well as NGO’s in all nine provinces, are using the strategies successfully in their local communities. The workshop will provide participants with an understanding of the following: (1) The impact of Emotional Poverty and community-based strategies for emotionally resourcing children in crisis; (2) Social Development – How to redirect young people “stuck” in low-level moral reasoning and how to support positive youth development; (3) Understanding the Violence Behavior Cycle and how to dismantle the common Thinking Errors young people use to justify negative behavior; (4) The special needs of street children and how the adult practitioner can bridge the gap of distrust; and (5) The special needs of rehabilitating and reintegrating gang members and former child soldiers.

 J’Lein Liese

In 1991, J’Lein founded the Institute for Multicultural Success International to provide quality programs that advance cultural understanding and reduce conflict in our schools and communities. In 2002, J’Lein founded the Foundation for Global Leadership. The Foundation for Global Leadership is a non-profit organization with offices in the United States and South Africa. Its mission is to foster opportunities for global learning.  J’Lein’s work both nationally and internationally specializes in violence prevention/intervention, responding to trauma, crisis management and issues concerning diversity.  A frequent trainer and presenter, J’Lein has developed and implemented programs throughout the United States, South Africa, the Netherlands, Egypt and China.  In 1998, J’Lein was a keynote speaker at World Habitat Day in the Netherlands. In 1999, MTV and the American Psychological Association featured J’Lein’s program, JumpStart: Mastering Anger, Self-Discipline & Emotional Control, in their award -winning documentary “Warning Signs” as an effective intervention for troubled youth. Currently, J’Lein is working with the South African government to support the implementation of the new Child Justice System.  In addition, J’Lein has published numerous curricula, articles and most recently contributed a chapter in a textbook for the University of Pretoria on redirecting troubled youth.

 Workshop 9: Accreditation Process for NGOs with ECOSCO and DPI of the United Nations

Sunday, September 28, 8:30am.

Since its founding in 1945, the United Nations has maintained relations with NGOs, who represent the concerns of civil society throughout the world. These relationships have been formalized in a number of U.N. resolutions that derive from the U.N. Charter itself. As stated in Article 71 of the Charter: “The Economic and Social Council may make suitable arrangements for consultation withDr. Pandita and Richard Zeif non-governmental organizations which are concerned with matters within its competence.” The preamble of the U.N. Charter itself begins “We, the peoples of the United Nations,” which has come to mean both Member States and civil society. This session will examine the various ways in which NGOs partner with the United Nations, with emphasis on the accreditation process for attaining consultative status with the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), and establishing an association with the U.N. Department of Public Information (DPI). Over 2,000 organizations worldwide have been granted consultative status with ECOSOC, among the three categories of consultative status (“General consultative status”, “Special consultative status” and “Roster”), with each level having different privileges and requirements.  There also are over 1,500 NGOs associated with DPI.

Dr. Kashinath Pandita

Dr. Kashinath Pandita is General Secretary of the Asian-Eurasian Human Rights Forum, an NGO that is a current applicant for ECOSOC status. Dr. Pandita received his Ph.D. from Teheran University in the field of history and civilization of Central Asian peoples. He taught at the University of Kashmir (India) for over 32 years and had risen to be a Director and Professor of the Centre of Central Asian Studies. He has numerous publications to his credit. With a long-term interest in human rights, Dr. Pandita has been involved with the Commission on Human Rights, and activily participating in various briefings of U.N. bodies, NGOs and other organizations at the UN Human Rights Commission. He also has been participating in the Working Group on Minorities, Indigenous Peoples and Refugees. The African Commission for Health and Human Rights Promoters, an NGO with ECOSOC status, has made him in charge of its Asian chapter, and he regularly contributes in that capacity. Dr. Pandita will be the editor of the first volume of Asian Commentary, a new quarterly journal to be published by the Asian-Eurasian Human Rights Forum.

Workshop 10: Essential Fundraising Skills for NGOs

Sunday, September 28, 8:30am.

 One of the most critical issues that non-profits face is ensuring financial sustainability for their good works to continue. This session will encompass five components related to fundraising. First, provided will be a fundraising overview, including such issues as fundraising as a management process involving proper organizational management, effective communication and prospecting and relationship-building; discussion of the need to diversify among various sources of NGO income (grants, gifts and earned income, etc.); and examples of successful fundraising techniques. Second, examined will be steps in developing a strategic, organized and realistic fundraising plan. In this step, participants may be asked to divide into smaller groups to put in chronological order a set of fundraising planning steps. The activity will help participants to learn that all fundraising efforts must be anchored on an organization’s strategic plan. The activity will also highlight the need to do research on prospective donors before deciding on the appropriate fundraising vehicle, be it a grant proposal, conference, and so forth. The third component of the session will involve developing a winning proposal, involving prospect/donor research, concept note preparation, and other elements. The fourth component is called “organizing for success” and involves fundraising as a team effort, as well as legitimacy, transparency and accountability as prerequisites to successful fundraising. The final component will be a recap of key fundraising principles.

 Katherine Panganiban Custodio

Ms. Katherine P. Custodio serves as Director for Development in the Business Development Unit of the Venture for Fund Raising Foundation, headquartered in the Philippines.  The Venture for Fund Raising has helped over 200 organizations from 10 countries raise funds. The Venture for Fund Raising was founded in 1999 by board members who have been experienced fundraisers for such organizations as The Asia Foundation, UNICEF, Greenpeace, OXFAM, the American Cancer Society, the National Museum, and other organizations in the United States and the Philippines. Ms. Custodio assumed her current position in October of 1999. Previous to this, she served as a Consultant and Accounts Manager for Ogilvy and Mather, handling accounts for such organizations as UNICEF (where she developed fundraising strategies, helping UNICEF to implement the largest direct mail campaign in the Philippines, building a base of 50,000 individual donors), Nestle Philippines, Unilever Philippines, and C & P Homes (Crown Asia Division). She has been the lead facilitator or facilitator at a number of fundraising and strategic resource mobilization workshops in countries such as Malaysia, Philippines, Indonesia, and Bangladesh.